Legal Justice for Victims of Institutional Sexual Abuse

Institutional Sexual AbuseEvery 92 seconds, an American is sexually assaulted. And every 9 minutes that victim is a child. Meanwhile, only 5 out of every 1,000 perpetrators will end up in prison. Approximately 75 percent of sexual abuse and assaults are committed by someone the victim knows. In many instances, perpetrators take advantage of their roles in institutions to prey on their victims. Unfortunately, the majority of sexual abuse victims are children who are abused by individuals who are employees or agents of facilities entrusted with the victims’ well-being.

The criminal and civil justice systems often leaves sexual abuse victims, most of whom were children at the time of the abuse, to suffer without any sense of justice. Until recently, adult New York child sexual abuse victims did not have an avenue to seek the justice they deserved because the statute of limitations had passed. However, with the passing of the Child Victims Act, victims can now seek the justice they deserve.

If you or a loved one has been the victim of institutional sexual abuse, you need to immediately seek legal help to protect your legal rights and get the justice that you deserve.

Child Victims of Institutional Sexual Abuse Can Seek Relief Under the Childs Victims Act

On February 14, 2019, New York Gov. Cuomo signed into law a major legislative change called the Child Victims Act. The newly passed bill gives of child sex abuse victims, including those abused by institutions, the ability to file a civil lawsuit against the offender and the institution that harbored them up until their 55th birthday. Previously school child sexual abuse survivors only had until their 23rd birthday to seek civil action.

The Child Victims Act also allows the revival of currently barred cases for one year. This means if you were unable to bring a suit against your perpetrator and the institution that protected them, the new law allows you to file a lawsuit within one year from the passage of the law no matter how old you are now or how old you were when the sexual abuse happened.

If you are a victim of institutional sexual abuse, or any other type of abuse, you will no doubt have questions about what the New York Child Victims Act specifically means for you. You only have a limited time to seek justice under this law. As such, it is important to immediately learn more about this law and what steps you should take to protect your legal rights.

What Is Institutional Sexual Abuse?

Institutional sexual abuse happens when a perpetrator engages in sexual conduct with an inmate, detainee, patient, resident, church goer, or any other such position. The assailant must be an employee or agent of the institution. These perpetrators manipulate and betray the trust of victims while using their role in the institution to intimidate those willing to come forward and shield themselves from criminal prosecution or civil justice.

These institutions may include:

  • Hospitals
  • Jails/prisons
  • Churches
  • Schools
  • Sports organizations
  • Treatment centers
  • Day care facilities
  • Summer camps
  • Senior centers

If you suspect that your child was the victim of institutional sexual abuse, or if you were a victim as a child, it is important to immediately take action to protect your loved one’s legal rights.

Call Us for More Information!

If you or a loved one is the victim of childhood institutional sexual abuse, you need to know how the Child Victims Act can help you get the justice you deserve. For more information or to better understand how this law can help you, please call our professional help center at 212-385-4410.

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